Your Online Trail and Travel Guide for Snowmobiling the U.S. & Canada

Don’t Drink and Ride

Snowmobiling requires alertness, caution, and attention. Your reaction time and ability to control your sled can be drastically affected after consuming even small amounts of alcohol. Alcohol can affect perception, reaction time, and response to unexpected situations.

Alcohol has been shown to be a contributing factor in most fatal snowmobile accidents. Alcohol also causes body temperature to drop at an accelerated rate which increases your susceptibility to cold and hypothermia. Snowmobilers often have access to remote locations miles away from help. If a situation should occur where help is needed, your chances of survival and treatment of injury can be greatly affected. Don’t let alcohol be a contributing factor to your fate.

When night riding visibility is reduced by darkness, it is much more difficult to spot and identify potential hazards in time. Overdriving headlights can also be a serious problem, so slow down when snowmobiling after dark. Ride with individuals familiar with the area. Always wear outer clothing with reflective trim on the arms, back and helmet. Never ride alone at night. Always dress in your full snowmobiling outfit even if your intended destination is just next door.

Be certain that all lights are operational and keep in mind that hand signals become increasingly more difficult to see as darkness sets in.

Snowtracks